Episode 121

How to keep your fitness and health goals w/ Fitness Trainer Ben Canning

Ben Canning is a personal trainer and founder and CEO of BC Training. BC Training is a personal training and fitness organization that assists both men and women to reach their desired goals and hit their maximum potential. Ben works with a number of clients worldwide around physical fitness, training, and mental health.

Ben is co-host of the weekly podcast We Hack Health with Dave Kennedy which has started a fitness and wellness movement online with the #WeHackHealth

Mentioned in this episode:

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Transcript
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Welcome to the business samurai podcast.

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I am John Barker with me today, hailing from the Emerald isle

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commonly referred to as Ireland, Mr.

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Ben Canning ben is a personal trainer, founder and CEO of bC training as

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a personal training and fitness organization that assists both men

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and women to reach their desired goals, hit their maximum potential.

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Ben works with a number of clients worldwide around physical fitness

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training and mental health.

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Ben, as co-host of the weekly podcast, we have helped with Dave Kennedy, which

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started a fitness and wellness movement online with the hashtag we hack health,

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go check it out on Twitter and their discord channel, which I'll make sure

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the links are in the show notes below.

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They have the second coolest logo by the way, on the internet next to mine.

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So take a long sip of your whiskey or Guinness, no matter what

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time of day, you're listening to this and let's welcome, Ben.

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Appreciate it.

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Thanks for having me.

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I think you nailed it.

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Cool.

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I appreciate that.

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Yeah.

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Good.

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So take a couple of minutes.

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Give a breakdown of your entry into the fitness space because out of some

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of the businesses to start, you're one of the trifecta, they always say

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health, wealth and relationships.

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So give us the back little backstory.

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How much detail and how many profundities am I allowed to use?

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You are allowed to use one profanity, every word.

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Okay.

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So for me if we go way back.

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Before I did what I'm doing.

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And I realized quite early on that I was highly unemployable.

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It just didn't work well for working with other people.

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So I knew that there was needed to be something that I did

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that was me working for myself.

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And it's always just fallen into whatever I have been into at the time,

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fortunately, or unfortunately, depending on what way you look at it, the first.

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Business, I guess that Iran was providing transport to different nightclubs across

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the country, which was just an excuse for me to get drunk fade by the seven nights

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a week and get paid pretty well for it.

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The shelf life of that was quite short to be honest, because I

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just couldn't keep up with it.

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And then after that, I find myself in the gym instead of in the club a

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friend of mine qualified as a personal trainer and he was like, look, I need

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someone to do my first ever before.

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And after I was like I need to stop in a piss every single weekend.

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So I'm your guy.

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And I just absolutely fell in love with it.

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I.

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At that time worked for someone again, really hated it.

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And I was like, what they do to get out of this?

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I had, after my original coach, I had an online coach and I was like this online

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coaching thing seems like the one like this guys just send me emails every week.

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Like it seems to be easy enough.

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So I was like, what they need to do to become an online coach.

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The first step was obviously become a gym floor coach that gets him for a PT.

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So I tried in the, I moved into lap started working on the

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gym floor in December, 2016.

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And it was always my goal to go fully online by December, 2021.

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So I'd given myself five years, I guess that was to be fully

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online off the gym floor.

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Obviously the recent global shit-show pushed everything

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about a little bit forward.

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And from.

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2020.

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So I guess two years I've been fully online, which has been

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the best thing I've ever done.

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Awesome.

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How did you have any other like fitness influences in your life

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to help that career transition?

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Was it just working in that gym that kind of gave you the experience or

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is there other certifications and stuff like that to set you apart?

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So the being qualified as a PT, I don't know if it's the same over there.

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I assume it's probably something similar the way I describe it as

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it's almost like adult learning, you just pay for the qualification.

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So it's like, when you do your driving test, they teach you how to pass

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your driving test, but they don't actually teach you how to drive.

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So whenever you get that initial certificate, it's okay.

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And then you sit down with an actual human in front of you and

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they tell you this the problems.

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What peer to the fucking textbook was this on?

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I don't remember this, but, and so there is a lot of learning from clients.

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And I think that's the best thing that you can do is just work with a lot of people

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to get an understanding of how people actually work on what their needs are.

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But in terms of like other qualifications, there isn't really anything specific,

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especially over here that is, seemed as a thing as a qualification, but there

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are like, weekly or bi-weekly courses or, weekends away or physic camps or,

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education comes from nutrition, things that I've done just along the way.

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There's my sort of interest is, has moved.

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The kicker here is, in the United States, the only thing you gotta do is

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shirtless pictures on Instagram, man.

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Yeah.

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That's it.

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That's it.

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That's it.

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You just need to do a photo shoot then you're feeling qualified.

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Yeah, pretty much.

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Yeah.

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I want to do what he's doing how much, but speaking of that, this is something

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we haven't really talked before this, other than the the hashtag we have

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Twitter and you see my weak lifts because I'm always hurt, which we'll

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get into that a little bit later.

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But how much has the the Instagram and the tech talks and all of that, nonsense,

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that's out there fricking ruined, people's attitudes and what they think

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it actually takes to improve, getting a healthy lifestyle, getting a weight that

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they like, you don't have to be ripped, but getting, are you, how does that

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affect when somebody comes to you and says, okay, The the fitness industry as

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a whole, in my opinion, is a shit show because for that exact reason, because

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people will post pictures of themselves when they look their best, because they've

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just done a photo shoot and they've went through absolute hell to get there.

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And then they try and sell that to you as well.

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I did this in 10 weeks, so he go I'll charge you X amount of dollars or Pines

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for whenever that is massively unrealistic in terms of a timeframe and whatever else.

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And as I've developed as a coach, I have realized that the body

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and the physique is almost the last thing that you worry about.

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And I think that's something that's massively overlooked in the

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start, especially, with the people that I work with is overcoming

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their sort of mental challenges.

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And then almost teaching them to forget everything that they know about training

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and nutrition, because with no disrespect to anybody, they don't come on a call with

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me because they are in super good shape.

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You know what I mean, common because there it's a shambles

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in some way, shape or form.

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And I call, but I used to do this and I used to do that.

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And I'm like, we need to forget everything that you used to do.

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And then we're going to build a, what we do moving forward.

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And answered your question Instagram tick-tock and social media and influencers

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on the fitness industry, I guess it's been the best and the worst thing for it,

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because it's been good in a sense that it has increased people's awareness of their

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health and fitness, but it has been bad in the sense that it's given them unrealistic

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expectations because people will come.

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They're like, oh yeah, yo, I'm going on holiday in six weeks.

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I need a six pack.

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And I'm like, okay you need to come to me a year ago.

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And then we probably,

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I guess how hard is it to deprogram the people that are getting

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constantly bombarded with that.

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Day in and day out.

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And I'm going to say initially it was quite difficult because

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it was just me telling them.

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But one of the best tools that I now have is everybody else in the client group.

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So at the start of the pandemic originally I started a week a group call

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because people want the dance director with other humans and whatever else.

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I'm one thing that I've picked up on that is that, I'm pretty

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much telling people the opposite of what they're used to doing.

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So they're like, I need to eat a thousand calories a day and do two

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hours of cardio and whatever else I'm like, no, we need to not do that.

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And then whatever.

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Talent people that they need to start increasing their calories.

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If they want to lose weight.

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They're like, I think I've contacted the wrong guy, but if there's 15, 20,

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25 other people in the group who have been through that process who have

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overcome those things themselves, they can tell them, just trust the process

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or, he actually knows what he's talking about, or this is how I dealt with it.

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And I often, if I'm on an initial consultation calls, I will, I'll

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try and emphasize the importance of the concrete beyond the me.

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Cause it's something that I compromised by myself to what I mean.

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It's everything that from their insights and their perspectives that they

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provide, that I can't give just being.

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Yeah, I think that's one of the things that's helpful when you see the online

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community of these guys putting in the work day in and day out, with the

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Twitter using that hashtag it's that reinforcement like community reinforcement

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and, coaching that drives me as well.

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Cause I'm like, I can't be, everybody I'll just sharing oh yeah, hashtag

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we Huck, Alison I'm sitting, having beers and we'll feed up.

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We'll not actually train into them.

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Like I need to live and breathe it.

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Like I need to do it if I'm prescribing it.

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Do you know what I mean?

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I guess that's the difference between you setting the lifestyle versus a diet.

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Yeah.

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You've got to turn it into a lifestyle.

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People are looking to shortcuts.

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And speaking of that, when somebody comes to you and they're there, it's kinda

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like doing the hard work versus looking for cheats, what's that magic pill.

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What's that supplement, how can I do this without touching a

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weight, taking a walk outside?

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How, if somebody.

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How desperate are they when they actually come to you to want

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change for them to actually get off their asses and do something?

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I think, I guess everything's person dependent.

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A lot of coaching in my opinion is saying it depends.

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Or does that make sense?

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So in terms of being a person dependent of the pans, what experience that

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they've had before, or, what sort of situation that they're in are they

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the person that is maybe a hundred pounds over wit or are they the person

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that'd be struggles to put on with?

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What is their motivation for change?

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Is it that they're overweight and it's health-related and they're like, I

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need to fucking do this because if I don't, my doctor says I'm going to die.

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And I've literally had those conversations before, or is it the similar sort

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of background that I came from that it's I'm like skinny little boy.

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Like I meant to be, 30 years of age and I'm skinny here, like cardiac genes here.

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Like how do I fit into my clothes?

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And it's a confidence thing.

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Or it's a, they just want to look and feel a certain way.

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So the.

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On what they actually need, but they generally come to me with

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their own perception of what they think that they should be doing.

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And we need to just on revel, all that on just literally start from the basics.

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And I don't have a, I look at you as a person and you've told me that, you're

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a family motto, you're a business owner.

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So I fit you into this box.

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It's what are you doing at the minute on how do we improve on each aspect

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of those rather than trying to just.

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Delete all of that and flip the table upside down and go, I need you to

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do X, Y and Zed, and that's going to get you to where you want to be,

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because I find over time that the too much change at once is overwhelming.

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It's hard to monitor it.

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So if we just look at, the things that we're doing and the things that we can

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approve on gradually, then you generally have much more longterm success.

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And for me, what I want to give everybody is an understanding of their body.

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And what's good for them and high, they can progress in whatever their goal is.

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So you actually had something I had wrote down is talking about too many

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changes at once for a lot of people, once I know even some of the stuff I'm

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going through now, this stuff that, where you've got didn't happen yet.

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Yeah, whether it's, like you said, you're a hundred pounds overweight or you can't

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keep it, it didn't happen overnight.

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So you can't expect you to gain a hundred pounds in six weeks.

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So you're not going to use it in six weeks.

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That sounds like a good diet challenge, to be honest with you.

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Yes.

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That would definitely be quick, man.

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Like I'm a be a YouTube star instantly, and those ones that

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are like, Hey let's can you eat a hundred thousand calories in one day?

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I haven't seen that one yet.

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They're using a 10, but how do you manage, is this a part of trying to

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gauge a baseline and I'm going to stick it to I in please dive into how you

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gauge like a mental baseline for where somebody is at as well, since that,

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that's obviously a big part of this, but do you say, Hey, give me a baseline

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of, what you do for a week or two, and then we can go from there to start

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making small incremental adjustments.

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Is that kind of European.

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Yeah.

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So I guess I'll take it back even further and talk you through like

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how the actual process of if you book a call with me actually work.

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So I assume that you have, will have done your research and being

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on the website, the way the website is not Fremont except burger call.

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So whenever you click that book a call, it will set up the time.

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And what that will do is it'll send you an initial questionnaire night.

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Again, this is something that's been built up over time.

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That it's quite an extensive question, or because I find that the more that

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I know the better, so there's maybe I think it was probably 75 80 questions.

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And that to me is to give me an idea as to what goes on in their general life.

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Like I interject something into that as well, real quick.

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I think from a business perspective, if somebody is willing to enter.

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Seventy-five to 80 questions, a hundred percent, their pain is

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enough that they want your help and it's not a fly by night thing.

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Yeah.

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Yeah.

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And I'm stealing that for some stuff I'm working on.

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So please continue.

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Sorry, but that's that is it almost pretty qualifies the person that if

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they're going to take the time to fill out, I, then they're willing to have

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the conversation and they, they're in a place that they're ready to meet change.

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Whereas some people would look at them going fuck that I'm not filling out.

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I'm like, it's too many questions.

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Oh, was this guy need to know about whatever it is.

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So it's quite extensive.

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It's really extensive.

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It covers, what they do day to day, who they live with, who is in charge

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of their food, their shopping their sleep, how many alcoholic beverages

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they have, how many caffeine caffeinated beverages they're housed, what their

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training looks like at the minute, what their food looks like at the minute.

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It's a lot, but that also gives me, our span tough in our 45 minutes before I

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have the call with him going through that, I'm looking for like red flags or

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things to, to pick up in conversation and.

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And generally that gives me a pretty good insight as to, okay.

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They have been tracking their food for the past three months.

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So they're already maybe a slight bit ahead, or this person has been

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training for five years, but hasn't seen any change and it's just like

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ready to bang his head against the wall.

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Cause he's not making any changes or it's this person has had the health

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scare and they've never trended.

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They've never looked after their food.

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So the doctors just told them, they need to sort something that's not, and they're

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coming to me with an absolute clean slate in terms of what they're doing.

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So that in itself is almost like it starts to allow me to build a picture.

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Then wherever we have the call, I always preface the call with this is just

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the sort of conversation versus the, of your question or because you know

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yourself, if you're talking to someone, you can see them, the answers that they

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give you, you're slightly different than the ones that they write down.

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So you just put it into you, just put it into their hands.

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In terms of the way that I said is that this calls for me to get an idea.

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What you're struggling with.

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What brought you here?

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If I can help on then what that actually looks like in terms of

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building out a problem moving forward.

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And I will dependent on the feedback that I'm getting.

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I will prove them on things in terms of they'll maybe tell me that they want to,

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I don't have the confidence to take the shirt off whenever they go to the beach.

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So I'm like, okay, but I want to know why that you want to have that.

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Like, why do you want that?

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Is it for you?

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Is it because someone fucked you often have read you're younger and you've

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been overweight ever since then.

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What's the reason why, and then that's, whenever you start to get into the, sort

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of the mindset side of things, because if you can have an understanding of why

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people actually want these things, then to get them there, it's that little bit

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easier rather than being like, okay.

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Once a six pack.

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Perfect.

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This is the plan for that sensitive.

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And that's it that.

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That to me is like the perfect approach.

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Again, going back to somebody is desperate enough that they want the change that

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they're, that they are looking for.

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How quickly, does it take to get somebody to, once you get them into the process

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where they're starting to build up their own steam, they're starting to see some

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of those changes in there and they're like, Hey Ben let's make this a little,

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let's make this a little bit more.

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I like this.

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It, I imagine that's also probably a happy trigger point for you where you're going.

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All right.

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I'm I know what I'm doing here.

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Yeah.

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I'm actually qualified to understand what's going on here.

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Yeah.

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It's actually funny because on the weekly group call, a couple of weeks ago, one

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of the guys was saying that he had passed the valley of sorrow as he called it.

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And I was like, explain that.

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And he was like when you sign up initially, you have this.

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Immediate I'm so excited.

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This is going to change my life.

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This is the best decision I've ever premiered.

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And then it obviously takes time for the results to follow.

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So you go through this say from week five until week 10 or 11, that there's

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slight changes happening, but you feel like you're putting a lot of effort in

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and you want more changes and then you go like week 12 and beyond that, you

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really start to see a physical chance.

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You feel better, you're sleeping better.

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Your energy levels are better.

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All these things are better.

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And then it's like you said, you're like if I feel good, this good training,

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three times a week for 45 minutes, what if I were to do four times a week?

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And then that's whenever it starts to come and you're like,

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Hey, I want to be a bit more.

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And then you get into that real positive, should actually feel really good.

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And then, everything that I look at is beyond just what

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the physical changes it's.

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Hi, or their energy on the calls whenever I'm speaking to them or, high

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they get on at work or, they just, there's a different look about them.

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And I'm one thing that I always will put back to people.

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If I'm looking at their check-in foods or whatever, I'll compare their first

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photos, obviously like the original ones too whatever we grown on, like the chemist

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tall you're standing, or look at how much happier you look in terms of the smile.

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So it's, there's a lot that sort of come along with it.

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But in terms of what you're asking generally, for people to start

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this actually physically CTN, cause you see yourself so much

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to see physically see change.

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I generally find it's about 12 from about 12 weeks on because you're

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very critical of yourself because you see yourself every single day okay.

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Yes.

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You can maybe see where combine or measurements come and

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dine, but the numbers on the check-in sheet don't mean shit.

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If you look in the Morocco, I'm actually different.

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That's an internal motivation dive into this real quick, because I'll let

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you explain it about the, not just the strict, strictly tracking the weight,

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that you see on the scale, but also how the measurements are so important to know

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which type of progress you're making.

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Yeah.

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For me, if I could fuck the scale, like the window for everybody, I

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would, because it's the biggest, it's the biggest hurdle in itself.

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And I think it I've had this actually have this conversation on a call with a

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client earlier on it's we have become so ingrained that, when people talk about

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losing weight, they look at the number because that is what they relate it to.

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And I'm like, okay, I fully understand it.

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Like I get it.

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And they've been brought up and, things like BMI will tell them that

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there will be space on their wit and whatever else I'm like, that's not

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taking everything into consideration.

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So for me again, for anybody who's ever been through the extensive question are I

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have equally extensive would be check-in sheet that there's I think there's maybe

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65 points on 65 different data points that cover everything from energy levels,

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ability to focus, your sleep, your mood.

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Did you do your gratitude log?

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Blood pressure, your heart rate variability and all the sort of

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markers allow me to build a picture of what's going on throughout the week.

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And then also if the scale doesn't move one week, I can go, okay.

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You didn't lose any weight this week, but this marker has improved.

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This is an actual health benefit that you're getting, or you're sleeping better

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or your energy better, or you're stronger.

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So from a, if we talk about a physical side of things, like I'll look at

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photos, I'll look at wit and I'll look at metrics in terms of measurements.

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And you will find that, they all don't move together, which fucks people

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up because if I'm losing weight, like where am I measuring this?

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Or if I'm losing measurements, where are we at not coming down.

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But I think the biggest sort of teaching point in that is looking

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at body composition because I've genuinely high clients before.

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Like when I worked in the gym floor that I've trained them for a year

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and their, there has literally.

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Exactly the same for the entire year, but obviously their body

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composition has still ETN.

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So being able to talk to themselves, they've been able to detach them from

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that number is always a big hurdle, but that's why I look at so many different

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data points, because while it's clear, losing weight or dropping centimeters

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in your measurements, like if we can look at improvements in how your heart's

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functioning or your blood pressure, or, your blood work it's way beyond

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just getting a six pack, like it's actual longevity of life and health.

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Oh, wow.

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I, so you actually get into blood work and things of that nature.

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You may be the first coach.

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I know that has actually went to that deep as far as having that with check-ins.

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I'm sure there was probably others, but I've never had a conversation with them.

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How much do you get beholden to, the fitness trackers and your

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bootstraps and all that kind of stuff?

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Is that a good baseline measurement in your opinion?

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I've done research on it awhile back, but not on newer versions.

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And I know others that are like.

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They live and breathe by what the numbers say on the fitness trackers.

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What's your perspective of, again, it's a bit of a double-edged sword

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because it's a grit tool because it can give us so many, so much information.

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Generally they're going to cover your steps or it's going to be able to show

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you how many calories you burned, or, it's going to be able to tell you your resting

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heart rate or your heart referrability or whatever it is, which is all great data

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to have, or your sleep, things like that.

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Whereas, before.

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Yeah, you have to use other things like just your time in

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terms of your I put or whatever.

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So it's a good tool in that way.

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What I see as a pretty big problem with it is people will go and do a spin class and

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be like, oh, I burned 657 calories here.

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I'm going to go on a 10 donuts because I've just, you're almost buying back the

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calories that youth you've just burnt.

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And they live and breathe that part of it.

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And that's again, that's probably just lack of education in terms of what's

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actually going on one thing that I'm a big advocate for, and this is just from my own

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personal experiences, taking a week off the wearable tech and actually having on

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there sound of how you actually failed, because I used to find that I would, I

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would wake up in the morning and I'd be like off of grit and then I've checked

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my up and aura would tell me that, I only have 43% sleep score and I'm like, I feel.

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Because the office on me that I feel shit.

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So I do think that why the wearable tech is great.

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You need to sometimes just check in with your shelf in terms of, and I

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do have that in the check-in sheet.

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It's okay.

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What was your sleep in terms of minutes?

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What was the efficiency in terms of what the app says,

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but how did you actually feel?

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Because there's often a big disconnect in terms of what the two are.

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And I think, I do often recommend, just take time off from Fitbit or

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whip or whatever it is, recalibrate yourself, and then come back to it.

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So again, it depends on the person, but I think that they're a great tool

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if they're used in the proper way.

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And you don't get too caught up in the details or the.

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Oh, yeah, no, I think the gamification aspect of it, if you've got

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that community is a good driver.

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For me, right now me and my wife will sit there and we're on the move

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streak and all that kind of stuff.

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And it's Hey, I make fun of her.

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You've only got, you got 10 galleries to go before you cross and get the

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three rings to the circle across, but it gives it a different type of aspect.

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And again, it's that community, that community feel that's out there.

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Do you do any work with competitors at all?

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Like a bodybuilder strength, training, CrossFitters, any of that

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type of stuff prepping for that?

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No.

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No.

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I think the, I wore my Arnold shirt for nothing today.

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Then the the reason that I don't, I used to coach a professional tennis

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player and the level of detail that you need to go into in terms

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of what they need as an office.

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Is so specific and why that's great knowledge to have on.

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So I'm going to coach professional tennis players for the rest of my life.

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It's a lot of time to put into just that one specific thing.

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In terms of like professional bodybuilders, they, how me, the

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guy that I just mentioned in terms of th the podcasts that we just

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recorded, like that's his thing.

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And I think that there's a, there's definitely a lot of

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wisdom in being able to outsource.

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So if somebody came to me and they're like, I want to do a bodybuilding

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show, I'm like, I'm not the guy.

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Like I can recommend if they're, if three people I can recommend them

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and able to outsource that I can't be a master of absolutely everything.

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Things like that, the specifics that you need to go into and the level of work

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that needs to go into each individual would take away from what I'm doing

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from everybody else, because I would have to relearn everything about what

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they need for, if it's bodybuilding, what they need coming up to going into

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the age, or if it's CrossFit what do they need in terms of like performance

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or, feel in their bodies or what.

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No, I, no, I understand that's now like I said, we haven't talked before this.

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That was actually a lot of my background.

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I didn't compete actually.

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It's still a goal.

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If I can ever stop becoming the walking entry that I am right now is to do a,

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is to do a physic show at some point.

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But that's actually was my out of high school with weightlifting.

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I'm 43, working out with people that did amateur competitive

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bodybuilding and seeing the massive amount of foods that they ate.

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And honestly I lived and worked that lifestyle for a period of time.

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And I do believe it's what caused my injuries particularly

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with my knee as I got older.

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Not that we were doing anything that I would think, even looking back on it that

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was in proper or incorrect, obviously it was just massive amounts of weight.

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And I put massive amounts of weight on my body in a over a period of time

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that I just don't think my frame.

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I think that was part of it.

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Cause I've always prided myself on trying to maintain proper, edit, form

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an etiquette in the gym without doing stupid things that you see other people

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do or teenagers come into the gym and grabbing weight that they shouldn't be,

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cause that's, that's a big part of it.

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So I've got that as a goal in there, but I, one of the things I don't, and I don't

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know if you even tracking any any of the stuff I do loosely track the bodybuilding.

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We're seeing lots of deaths with steroids at the professional level and then it's

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coming out more and more that, the, the actors, whether they'll admit it or not

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to get ready for a role, like you said, in 12 months they've gotten assistance.

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And I think that's setting up a potentially bad

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mindset for, kids coming up.

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They're seeing the, their action heroes.

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Not look like Bruce Willis did when I was growing up like a,

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kind of a, just a normal dude, but freaking the incredible Hawk.

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And I just I'm worried about that setting up the wrong expectations

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if people are not going to be forthcoming in those discussions.

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And I just don't know if some of the circles you talk around if

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that's something you worry about for general public health at all.

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Yeah.

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I've had many conversations and, as.

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As we spoke just before, like who I train and the people

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that I work with has massively changed over the past, 18 months.

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And the more that I moved to coach and more meals and especially coaching

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more meals in America, the more the conversation comes around TRT and

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things like that, which is obviously different than, performance enhancing

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drugs and like going down that street.

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And I'm happy to have open conversations about that because

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I have the knowledge for it.

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Anything beyond that I wouldn't be referring, like I wouldn't

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be recommending doing, whatever they need to do to get on stage.

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I do think that is definitely a big part of what's missing because If

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you think of, even we talk about the competitors academic bit, like Chris

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Bumstead, easing incredible ship, but we all know how he got there.

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Do you know what I mean?

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But if I were me starting my training career by eight years ago, if I look

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at him and I'm like, I can do that.

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I'd be able to do that.

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There's no problem.

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And I think, again, it just comes down to, because it's seen as, I dunno if I assume

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it's the same over there, but he, because it's seen as a taboo subject, people

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don't want to have the conversation.

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So if I decide, okay, I want to get big and become a

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bodybuilder, I then have to go.

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Okay.

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This is what I need to take.

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And this is what I need to do.

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And it comes from just lack of education.

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And I guess one of the biggest things that I've seen when I worked in the

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zoom Flores is people starting into that too early, like not reaching

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their true natural potential before going down that street, like CNN as a

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shortcut on CNN, the more that I take.

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That bigger I will be when it's not necessarily like that.

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And again, if we take it back to looking at blood work and looking at blood

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panels and how your body responds and levels of things, you'd be out and doing

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it in a healthy way, it can't be done.

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And I don't follow a lot of coaches and I don't really have many

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conversations with many coaches.

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How may I will talk to who is obviously on the road to become

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a professional bodybuilder?

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So I have that insight on my former coach, Callum, like he T he coaches

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professional athletes that's what he does.

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So following his stuff and having understanding of his process and

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educating the athletes in terms of what they're taking and how long they

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should be taken up for an almost like.

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The way that he moving things is it's about spreading the risk.

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So obviously with all these things that you take, there, there

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will be adverse side effects.

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And what he looks at is instead of pushing things to maximum limits in terms

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of maximum how much testosterone you can take, he looks at, different like a

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couple of different compounds on doing like a smaller dose of those things.

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So we're looking at it from a health perspective, over a broad spectrum,

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so that you're not like really putting that that much sort of pressure and

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challenge on what's going on your liver or your heart or whatever it is.

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No, I agree.

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And having went back to been to as many shows, I had even been to one, I

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remember this years ago, a friend of mine was competing in a regional and

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it was not drug tested, but you could clearly identify after you, you learned.

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To a degree and you sit there and you're going, Hey, we went across

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the stage and we were like natural.

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Nope Nope.

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I'm not from that.

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It'd be just because of the, the amount of muscle there.

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And I said, I'm, here in the U S it is absolutely taboo.

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Is that unsafe?

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It's it's it reminds me growing up.

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It was before it became WWE WWF.

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Nobody wants to admit it.

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That wrestling was fake.

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It was like, hold on a second guys.

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This stuff scripted out and all this kind of stuff.

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Bodybuilding in and of itself.

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And again, like I said, transitioning to medium, where everybody is

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ripped out of their minds in movies and television shows nowaday.

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I am a little concerned with the influence that has outside of someone,

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my age going, Hey doc, I need some TRT.

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I can't, I'm not sleeping well, I'm, I think it's a, even good dynamic in terms

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of the conversation, like what clinics on what you guys have available over there.

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From that perspective, I think is incredible because, you have

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professionals that can look at it and prescribe and get you back to optimal.

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And it's not a by, push into those like super physiological ranges that are

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just absolutely fucking ridiculous.

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It's how can you get back to function at an optimal so that you can, like you

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said, sleep better or have more energy or renovate after the kids or, still continue

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to train or recover or whatever it is.

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I think that should be talked about more because.

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I have no I'll talk about it and try and calls and couple of guys that are running

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CRT, they are we'll openly have the conversation because they almost wasted.

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They had someone, they talk to you about it whenever they went, then the process.

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But yeah, I think that, you know what, especially, if you're talking

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about actors, like what they have to put their bodies through rule

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the rule in terms of how different they look like that it's definitely

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something that's not spoken about.

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And I think you're, again, it just comes down to the influence and the

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social media and the, I guess the improper expectations that the people

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and especially younger generation.

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Yeah.

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And again, it's something that I've thought about for my own health as

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I've gotten it, hitting that mid forties, mark and I kid you not, man.

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I've put a beating on myself over the years.

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I mitigated beating from just gym training and I'm at the point now

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where let's see blew up the knee twice.

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Once was from basketball.

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I just played basketball.

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Then I had a cartilage chair tear that I can't explain what happened.

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It just, I wake up one day and I'm falling down just by standing up.

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So like days can be interesting if I'm there.

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I can do them.

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No squatting of course, no way high impact two AC three AC joint

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decompression procedures from just all the pressing overhead.

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And then just like just constantly spraying something along that,

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something along that line.

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That again, I think it goes back to working out with some of those guys.

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Massive.

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I'm talking over 300 pounds doing the bodybuilding thing

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off season, over 300 pounds.

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And man, I was right there with them at, let me see at that time

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period, I was probably 180 5.

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I got up to two 40 and got nice to two 40 and I was actually like, I'm probably two

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40 now, but it's like the Oreo in that.

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And part of that is some of the injury I've been going

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through for three months now.

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It's just absolutely stupid nonsense.

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But some of the other benefits you've mentioned some of the mental, the

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creativity, do you get a lot of responses where somebody is Hey man, I missed my

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workout today and now my whole day sucks.

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I can't, I haven't been able to work at my job because that rush, that

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endorphin thing is that, it's sure that's some other tangible benefits.

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Other people.

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Yeah, for sure.

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May not think about when they're looking at this, if they're only looking at,

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you want to throw the scale out and it's hold on a second, your whole

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performance went up across the board, man.

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Yeah.

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Yeah.

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And to know what I mean, as, I don't know whether it's come from the podcast

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and people actually hear me speak about it or whether things are changing, but I

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have literally had clients come to me and say, look, I need better mental clarity.

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What can we do to get that?

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Like I need to, especially with the industry, you know what I work quite

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a lot with information security and cybersecurity, so they need to be

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switched on to what the fuck's going on.

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Coming to me, I'm like, I need to be focusing better.

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I need to function better.

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Like I have this brain fog and I need to get rid of it.

Speaker:

It's funny having those conversations because people are almost coming for what

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the by-product is that they don't usually.

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And that obviously the, the physical side of it and the teams that is

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create that comes alongside that.

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But they're not coming to me with, I want all these things that, that people

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don't know that they're going to get.

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So I don't know, like I said, I don't know whether it's people are just

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changing or it's just because of the information that I've been putting in.

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I would sit there and say the one thing that when COVID

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started, I was the gym rat, man.

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That's so back going back into my early twenties, I was that dude working

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out those bodybuilder guys in the gym for three hours a night till I

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finally started getting old enough.

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I'm like, I got to do some other things.

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We've got to cut these workouts.

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We don't, I only need to be in the gym for three hours.

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And I do, I am not exaggerating when I say three hours a night because I

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distinctly remember the conversation with the guys going, I can't spend

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that much time in here anymore.

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But when COVID started doing the gym build out at the house and

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the one thing that I always get.

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I've always said when you're working on a problem and you're stuck on

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something, go do something else.

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Go take a walk, stop trying to force yourself to be creative, stop trying

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to force yourself to find a solution to problem, go do something else.

Speaker:

And I have found since I've built the whole gen out, I keep a notebook

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down there because the most random thing that I'm not thinking about

Speaker:

that I was thinking about two days ago that the, it's oh, Hey, dummy.

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where was this?

Speaker:

But but you mentioned the cybersecurity professionals.

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So talk about how the we hack helped the movement kinda got started.

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What was the origin?

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Cause I'm trying to think of when I came into it and honestly I can't

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remember exactly it's now it just feels like something that I do.

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I don't remember how it got started, how I, who I was connected to

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that initially started doing it.

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I'm like, oh, Hey, hold on a second.

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Yeah.

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Yeah.

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If we take it back to, obviously we fully transitioned it online and then,

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I'm have no, I'm pretty open about this.

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Like I started coaching Dave, and to me it was just the F like he

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contacted me through Facebook.

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It was just as a fan.

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Anybody else had contacted me.

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And then all of a sudden he's got fucking 150,000 followers on Twitter.

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And he says fucking cybersecurity is Eunice.

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I'm like, who are you really?

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What the fuck's going on here?

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And then from that, just him posting his sort of success, like the, my client

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base in America grew and grew for people who are doing a similar sort of job.

Speaker:

And I think, again, The more I got into it, the more sort of patterns that I

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could see as to what people struggled with and they are all in the same industry.

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So they all have similar struggles in some sort of way.

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And I was like, we need to put this information out.

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We need to find a way to do this.

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And it was actually Martin, the guy who I'm going to say takes all my photos,

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but the guy, the photographer that I use quite often first of all, he said,

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you should start a YouTube channel.

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I was like, no, cause I wasn't the one I didn't speak, no, I I it's

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coming, but I didn't like the, I don't like speaking the book.

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It didn't like speaking in front of the camera.

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And I didn't like, cause there's a mic here.

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It would have freaked me out.

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I can have a conversation with you all day long because there's a mic and us record.

Speaker:

And I would've been like, oh, I can't do that.

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And then I was just literally having a conversation with Dave one day and

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I was like, Thinking about starting a podcast, do you want to do it with me?

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And I was like, he's too busy.

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Like you might want to do that.

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And he was like, I be fucking on.

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And I was like, holy shit, really?

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So then it just it just came from there.

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And then we started the podcast.

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I'm going to say September, August, September, August, last year.

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Yeah, September, August.

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And it's specifically just gone from strength to strength.

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Obviously one thing I'm very grateful of is the presence that

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the have has on Twitter and social media that's helped us grow.

Speaker:

And to me, one of the coolest things about it is, okay, yes, it's great

Speaker:

getting on a six pack or whatever it is like I'm in a position.

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And I, with the information that I'm putting out on the audience and

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everything is comes along with it, that I can actually help an entire industry,

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which is a unique position to be in.

Speaker:

So I can actually help them with, being more productive at work or, living

Speaker:

longer or handling their stress better or sleeping better or whatever it is.

Speaker:

And it's a very unique position to be in.

Speaker:

And to me it's something that Kim totally out of the blue for that feeling.

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And somehow I really loved it and it's actually quite good because.

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If I'm speaking to someone on the initial consultation

Speaker:

call, they will have lessened.

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Generally they will have listened to some episodes of the podcast.

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So they already have a bit of an understanding this to me

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and you don't have to have that awkward, initial conversation.

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And yeah, no, but not even even with that, because it's because

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of the high stack goes to Twitter.

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Like I already have, I already know who you are, whereas before I'd have into it.

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And then you have this total stranger that doesn't know who I am or has

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never read things that I have.

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Yes.

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They've ever read, maybe read things that I have written, like when I used

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to post a lot on Instagram or whatever.

Speaker:

But I think having heard someone's voice in how they actually are,

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is entirely different than reading something that they have written.

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And I think that it's helped me and my business massively and in so many

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ways that I couldn't ever have a.

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No.

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Absolutely.

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And so a little bit about my background, I've been in tech.

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I did not know.

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I didn't know, Dave, I've never talked today outside of me sending him stupid

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gifts on some of his posts online.

Speaker:

That's the extent of it.

Speaker:

But I've been in, in tech and now just doing consulting and

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obviously doing this podcast here, but you're not you're not wrong.

Speaker:

Having been in the tech cybersecurity field for 20 plus years, it's not

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known for its physical wellbeing.

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It's the opposite.

Speaker:

It's the Cheetos.

Speaker:

The mountain is Cheetos and mountain Dew by the case, man.

Speaker:

Again, this is a chemo bite, sorry to interrupt you.

Speaker:

But it's it's like, it was almost like a.

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A Dick measuring contest for want of a better phrase as to another one

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who stayed up their latest or who was the most drunk or, or whatever it is.

Speaker:

And I'm like that, this is the literally the opposite of what you should be doing.

Speaker:

And especially from a cognitive function and what they're actually managing and

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what they're actually trying to achieve.

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And I was like, we need to change this on a big scale.

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And actually one of the, one of the cool things that I've noticed recently is at

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the start, it was a lot of people who were coming to me and they were like, I've

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spent, 20 years of my focus on my career and I haven't really focused on myself

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and I need to fix up because, okay, now I'm this super successful person in the

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business of the company or whatever, how long am I going to live to be able to

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see this site, there's been a shift in terms of like younger people coming to me

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like, oh, I've heard you talk about this.

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And I've already talked about that.

Speaker:

And I'm preempting that a little bit and I don't wanna have those health issues

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and I don't wanna have those injuries.

Speaker:

So I want to get on the ball with things sooner rather than later,

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which is, has been a cool shift.

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No, I, and that's, I'm trying to articulate.

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That's awesome.

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That's what I've seen.

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Because back when I was younger, my whole thing was, I want to break

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the norm of what the traditional it person was thought of, and I and until

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I blew out my knee, the first time, I actually was pretty good at that.

Speaker:

And I still see people now.

Speaker:

As I've tried to, launch the podcast, as well as restructure the consulting

Speaker:

and get relaunched from that, for as a new entity for myself or restructuring

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of the entity that I've got, I still have people come up to me now.

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And Hey, man, how do you, how what's your work day look like?

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And I say I'm usually up at five.

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I immediately start to go to work.

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I said, depending on when I get a big thing done is when I go work.

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But I'm like toast.

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By the time he gets eight o'clock at night, my wife makes fun of me.

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She's you, it like start your nights.

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I said, I started my nights before, like 10.

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I said, I'm in, I'm ready to go lay down at eight o'clock and then I

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hear people going, oh, I do both.

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I get up at five and I stay up until midnight.

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You're an idiot.

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That's not going to last long.

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And quite frankly, I don't even know if I believe whatever the hell you're

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talking about, to be honest with you.

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But I have that happened probably about once a week where somebody says

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some stupid stuff like that for me.

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So that's the reason why I think I really, I liked the movement because it's putting

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spotlight on a, it's weird to say a specific industry of people that are not

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cheerfully known for health and wellbeing.

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And when you're talking about cybersecurity and particularly in

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this day and age, you're always on.

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I'm so happy.

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I don't do any hands on stuff anymore.

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It's funny.

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It's funny because there, obviously with things start doing up, like

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I've been meeting people that haven't seen the wild and Amman guy

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that I work with is a videographer.

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And he was just this is where the YouTube thing came about, but he

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was like talking about flogging and what that should look like.

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And he's like the last time that we shot a video, you're in the gym floor

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and we did this thing and it was the majority females and it was all everybody

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looking pretty and whatever else.

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And then it was like, what are you up to?

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And I was like, I work with majority hackers and he was like I was like, yeah.

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And then told them the whole story.

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And he was like, and I was like, I don't know why, but it's it's far

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beyond the thing that I like about it.

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The most is what I can give back to these guys.

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And girls is his health on years on their life.

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It's not necessarily, you want the small waist and a big bomber drop a dress size

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or some fucking superficial bullshit.

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It's we can actually, help you live better for longer.

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In terms of even not even talking about their career and they're high,

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they're able to function at work.

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Like January may improve people's blood work.

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I've had clients come to me and they'd be like, my doctor actually couldn't

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believe the improvements in my blood work.

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From the last time I did two nigh, he was like, he was asking me what I was doing.

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And he said, it's just fucking keep doing what you're doing.

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And I'm like that to me is code because that's beyond physical teens, like

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that's number one, something that people generally wouldn't look up, but number

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two, you, something that will literally allow you to live longer for your family.

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It's just a great.

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How hard is it to, this, some I've thought about, luckily my wife is

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she runs, she uses the gym and stuff like that with some of the clients.

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Do you get them to turn it into a family affair?

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Because I know change for one can rub off on the other one

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or cause resistance in inside.

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It's not everybody's on the same page.

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Yeah, I think again, it depends on the person too.

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It depends on their dynamic, more than anything.

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But generally I find that if the partner is supportive,

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the journey is much smoother.

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Let's say if they're not on, they're like, I'm trying to have my.

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Tovala Maitland there, having fucking Peters it's difficult.

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Whereas if they have a, if they have a bit of it on their stand and

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all that, and they're like, okay, I respect what you're trying to do.

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And I understand it.

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Then it's much easier.

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And some people, I'll get a message being like, oh, my wife wants

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to know, do you coach females?

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I was like the majority of my career, I've coached females.

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And then, know, you're coaching both of them, which is always an

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interest in insight on dynamic.

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But yeah, it depends on the person, but I definitely have noticed

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over the years that if the partner is on board with things, the

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whole process is much smoother.

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Gotcha.

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Do you find that again, I don't, this is something I used to see in when

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I was going to the gym, let's say like I did for 20, some odd years.

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It seemed to me that the coaches that were working with other people

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Eh, they weren't in my mind, you go, you got to ramp up period.

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You've got that learning period where you're not going to push

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somebody overly hard, cause you don't want to get somebody so sore.

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So exhausted.

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So fricking tired.

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It's oh my God, I don't ever want to do that ever fricking again.

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But I would repeatedly see what I considered to be the exact opposite

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of that, where it's like, they weren't even pushing them at all.

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And then they'd go take up like cat w my thing was, they were taking up

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the machines for fricking 30 minutes.

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Cause they weren't really pushing the clients.

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Is that, how can you gauge level of effort with some of that stuff to know that

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somebody is being online that they're putting in the right amount of exertion.

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I Are you having them track.

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Reps and sets time and you go in really deep into that type of stuff.

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Or how do you know they're exerting the correct amount?

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Yeah, so I'll, and this is stupid because this is completely out

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of order and I should probably, they just hit me in that's.

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Okay.

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That's fine.

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I know, I don't worry.

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I know how it goes around in circles.

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It's fine.

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Yeah.

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The so yes.

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And answer to your question.

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The biggest challenge that I thought I would face whenever I moved fully

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online is how can I try and give every single aspect of me being there

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stood side by side, being remote hi, how can I give everything that I can,

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if I'm stood there beside you, and is flora put in a remote setting on

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it, it just comes down to, to, to collection of data and things like that.

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So in terms of workouts, everybody has obviously they get delivered their plan

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and the workout, and we will look up, progression of, are you getting stronger?

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Are you doing more reps?

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What does that look like?

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Are you improving in terms of your cardio time or whatever it is.

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But one big thing that I look at is.

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Get them to video some of their sets.

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So yes, I will do it from an exercise execution standpoint, but

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the other side is I'm like, I know where that is in your workout.

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If you're like fresh with your t-shirt all on and like you're

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looking for a long, like you haven't given me enough up until that point.

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And I haven't actually disclosed that to any of them, but it gives me an insight

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as to what they're actually doing.

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And I talk a lot about intensity when I'm on the group calls and things like that.

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I'm actually one of the main reasons of me traveling next week over to the guys is

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to show them what intensity in a workout should look like because I can program

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the same worker for 10 people and they would each performance in a different way.

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And I think that the intensity of the workout is.

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It's difficult to teach unless you're visually showing them.

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And the way I get around it is I talk about it a lot.

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I also show my own training.

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Not that they need to train at that capacity and then always see

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there's the, there's this sort of community internal competitiveness.

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And everybody is to, they're putting in the chat, like our PBMs are PB and that,

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and it's good because it'll drive the other people if they want to get onto it.

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But there's also a lot of support that goes in the group really

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fucking good job and they'll share their videos and whatever else.

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So again, where the community aspect comes into it.

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You ever, do you ever have to kick anybody in the ass for

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not working out hard enough?

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Yeah.

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How do you know what I, I can.

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I like people to think that they can come through with any sort of problem.

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But at the same time, I don't like to think that they

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can get away with anything.

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Yes.

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I understand that everybody's human and they'll make mistakes and I

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forget things and whatever else, but I'm not here to be a babysitter.

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Like I'm not here to just baby you through the process.

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If I don't think you're pulling.

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Literally I will, I'm happy to call people because at the end of the day,

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you're talking about the people in the gym floor that they, and I've

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seen this before and it's influence.

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It's almost that they see that the less that they push them the longer that they

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will coach them, if that makes sense, which I guess is a smart business model.

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But for me, I'm quite open with people in the initial conversation and how

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I was like, it's my job to educate you to the point that you no longer

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need to work with me, which just is a fucking ridiculous business model.

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But the biggest thing that I think is missing from the internet on the fitness

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industry as a whole is an education as to, okay, 10 years down the line.

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Can I still do the things that you're prescribing me to do now, or how many

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different phases of things that we need to go through so that everything

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that you need to know long beyond our.

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That?

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No, I just lost the train of thought or the question I had, I

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should have really looked down.

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Sometimes I write it.

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I write that in there.

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All right.

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If that comes back to me, I'll just shoot that to you later.

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I'm going to ask, I've got, I got two questions.

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So like I said, I've been in this kind of the fitness realm for a long time,

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but I've never been able to get a a clear answer on one particular question.

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Anyway.

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How do you know the difference when you're your body really needs a break

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versus your mind telling you no verse that moment of weakness where your mind is?

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I just don't feel like doing it today because I know that is

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something over the years that I've struggled with going, okay.

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Maybe I'm reaching a point of legitimately overtraining.

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If I showed you some workout logs and then waking up going,

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I can't do this today versus.

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Hey, what's go fricking put on your shoes, go get your rest rafts.

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Let's fricking go.

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How what's the best way to identify the difference of that.

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So you're not injuring yourself.

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I would say that.

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If we think about actual overtrain and for general population,

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they're not going to reach that.

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You need to be at a certain level, you need to be able to train at a certain

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level and you need to have put the literal reps in to actually be able to

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take your body to the intensity, to the Prius of actually over-treating so 95

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times out of a hundred, if someone thinks they're over-training and they probably

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not, I'm not saying it's not a thing, and I'm not saying that people can't

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get there, but you need to be seriously focused, put into your body through

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hell to actually take you to a point of over-training and my old workouts.

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Yeah.

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I don't find it.

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But I guess this is where it comes down to being in tune with your body.

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And again, to take it back to what I, the best thing that I have from

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my own perspective for training and nutrition is an understanding of my

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body, what it needs when it needs it, what the strip back, when I need to,

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what the push, whenever I need to.

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And that has literally just come down to.

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The past eight years of my chain.

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And I don't understand I'm working with different coaches.

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So it's always something that I want to give back to the client.

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It's not understandment.

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So if I'm looking at their check-in sheet and they're telling me that they're not

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recovering, or they're not sleeping, or they're not hungry, or they're, they're

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just not motivated to train or they're not progressing in terms of their workout.

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And then I look at the numbers in terms of, okay, hits V's dine hard

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referrability Stein or resting heart rates up, or, you're not actually

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sleeping then it's okay, maybe we need to actually, pull things back here

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for a week and I'm trying to go again.

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Do we just take three or four days off and do a deal with that way?

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Or do we just pull it back that you do, the CMI does work, but

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you just do it at less capacity.

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And it just comes down to data management, which is funny because

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this is how I worked before I worked with the people that I work with.

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And if I talk about data analytics, they're like fucking eyes light up.

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I fucking love that.

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Like I'm tracking that all day long, so right.

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It's just it's one thing that they actually was put back to me.

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It's the hackers in the information security, like they spent their

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life hacking at least different things, but never actually

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understood hacking themselves.

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And whenever you give them data, it's funny because I'll start with an amount

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of, this is what your check-in sheet looks like, and this is what we do.

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And then they come back, like, how did they send them my check-in sheet?

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And I pulled the data and I look at it on a monthly basis and I look for trends and

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I'm like, this is what it's all about.

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It's like, how can we take the information that we have find out what

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the good days or the good weeks are, and then replicate them to improve on.

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And it's just a bit having that data and information.

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No.

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Totally agree.

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As long as you don't get it analysis by paralysis.

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Exactly.

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But I think that's, I think that's a good, that's why it's

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good to have a second set of.

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Do you know what I mean?

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That's why it's good to have someone else that up because

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you can look at it yourself and you can get too caught up in it.

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Whereas I can look at it from my perspective and I'll pull up

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your check-in sheet and I can rationalize it a bit for you.

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You're like, oh that makes sense.

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That goes right back into a while.

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I'll make an argument for even a business going, why you need a

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consultant for instance, you're a coach.

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It's hold on.

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I'm not beholden to your internal politics, your internal beliefs.

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I'm here to give you an objective thing.

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And if you think that my opinion has value because of previous experience

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or results somewhere else, you're going to fricking listen to me.

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And if you don't too many times probably don't want to work with you.

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What's the point of not sitting around.

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So I wrap up with, to your question.

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Yeah.

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Okay.

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That's all right, because you said you hadn't been able to get an autopsy.

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Oh, that was the one.

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Yeah, because I don't disagree.

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I don't disagree with you saying that most people won't get there.

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I would say I would follow probably again, you can take me to my word

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for it or say I'm full of crap.

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I believe, I know legitimately I have done that, through training programs

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before doing either re compositions.

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And really, arms, I can't lift my arms over my head.

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I can barely close my hands to make a fist.

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I have been there more times than I can count over the years.

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Not recently.

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I, it's probably been two, two and a half years since I've been

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at that point because I just keep going in and out of this stupid.

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I, no kidding.

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I'm hurting myself in my sleep is what's happening.

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The reason my, my I've had sleep studies done my watch, my apple

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watch will sit there and say in my sleep that I have walked 200.

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50 steps, a hundred steps.

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And when a sleep study, because I'm mentally subconscious of being hooked up

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to all the wires, I'm not moving at all.

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So they're like we can't find anything wrong.

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And then I'm coming back and I'm all twisted up like a pretzel and doing

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all kinds of stuff and waking up.

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And both of my arms are numb.

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So that's some weird nonsense that I'm going through.

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That puts me into that orthopedics either.

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What dream client or nightmare, depending on depending I've made a very good friend,

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that's an orthopedic PA over the years and they, it's bad when you walk into

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the doctor's office and the receptionist goes, Hey, John, how you doing?

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I've been here too many times a year.

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You've been there for probably a few too many times of which I can

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sit there and legitimately say some stuff was and other things, or Mr.

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Andrews if you could wrap it up with this, if there's something again, You're

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in a highly competitive marketplace.

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There's lots of people out there and there's lots of people coming out with a

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lot of preconceptions that we've talked about, at nauseum here, if you could

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wave a magic wand and make something go away to make your life better, when they

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come to you, what would that probably be?

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Be that culture.

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Because again, it depends, but that culture becomes almost like a cult.

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So people who do keto will live be like, it's the only way or

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people who do intermittent fasting.

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It's the only way.

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And while I will pass these diets and I'll make from a keto and

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whatever else, it's the lack of education that comes with them.

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So it's okay, you just want to eat protein and fat, but why are you doing that?

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What's the actual purpose of DNR.

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And I think that, that culture as a whole is.

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Really messing up people's relationship with food, like really messing

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people up, releasing superfood.

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And I agree.

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That's where the biggest talents comes at.

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People come and be like, I can't eat carbs because, I saw my mom do this that 50

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years ago and I'm like fucking out, like where do we even begin with this one?

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But it's.

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The, yeah it's just that people believe that this is the way.

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And the thing that I say about it is it's everybody who says this is

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right on wrong because keel might be the best thing for that one person.

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And they have lost a hundred pounds and they faded grit and everything

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that comes along with semen under my fast and CMF antidote.

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But it doesn't mean it's going to work for me.

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And that's, people will have a conversation and be like, oh

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yeah, you want to lose weight?

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Okay.

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I did.

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Ketosis is what you need to do.

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And I was like, no, it doesn't really work like that.

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It's understand what's going on.

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What's going on with you and how you can build something out that will

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allow you to have sustainable weight loss or muscle gain or whatever it is.

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And I think if I could get rid of that culture, it would, it

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would save me a lot of time.

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But it would see if it genuinely, I think it is, it's one of the biggest

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issues that people face because they just are so lost in what to do because

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they will read one article and the read the next one, a thousand, the opposite,

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and the read, the next one that tells them something totally different.

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Again, We're hi, can I process and how can I get this?

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And to think about it is all of them have some good points.

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For myself sometimes I'll use faster because, if I relate it back to when

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I was on the gym floor, if I had a heavy morning of clients and it was

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working, say 6:00 AM to 1:00 PM.

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If I didn't need in the morning, I was fine the whole way through.

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But if I have my breakfast at 5:00 AM by nine o'clock, I was

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starving and I was pissed off.

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So I would have used intermittent fasting.

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I didn't well by telling everybody I was doing at the minute

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Fosun and the same with, keto.

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My first, generally my first two minutes of the day will be high protein and

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high fats because cognitively I feel better by telling people I did keto,

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but I've taken bits from each one to build out something that's for me.

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So I think if I could get rid of one thing, it would be dark culture.

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Back in the days of me not looking at I ate a tub of Oreos I would get that

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and I would see the people do the same thing and not make any progress at all.

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They would sit there and think that, oh, I'm doing intermittent fasting.

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I can legitimately eat anything I want and whatever window they set, whether it was

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eight hours, four hours, if you want to, you can still eat fucking 5,000 calories.

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It doesn't take long for that stuff to, to, to add up or the ones.

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I actually had that conversation recently.

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I can't have any carbs because.

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Dude that doesn't, it doesn't work that way.

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You're eating a tub of butter and three packs of baking.

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Give me a break, dude.

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You just sell them 4,000 calories.

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Some of the things that people say and they're like, even if you've

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been dying to, I guess you guys have drove there, like slimming world and

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weight Watchers and stuff like that, they're like, oh no, I can eat a bowl

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of fruit, but I can't have a blender.

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And I'm like, what?

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I can't have a smoothie, but I can eat all of the fruits that I

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would put in this movie separately.

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Or oh yeah, I can eat on unlimited pasta and I can eat unlimited potatoes,

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but I need, half of a Freddo bar.

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And I'm like, if you tell me I can eat unlimited pasta challenge accepted, like

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you're ready to see some shit I'm here.

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Like I'm not going to lose any width.

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I'm going to get a lot of pasta.

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Do you know what I mean?

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It's just the stupid rules that people live in de.

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Oh, yeah, I did that.

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I just approve a point.

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Cause I usually fall into the calories in calories out, if it fits your macros

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type of thing, as long as I hit the the protein number, I personally don't really

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give a crap how the other stuff typically splits out, per se, that's just me.

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I found out having done my yo-yoing through the years.

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But to prove a point somewhat, I was down I was down calories for the day

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and I fricking ate two Hershey bars.

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I wake up and I'm a pound and a half down the next day.

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You can't do that every day.

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It just it fit the bank account numbers that I was allotted for that day.

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So anyway, that's my own.

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Yeah, I think, and again, you've worked that out for yourself.

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Do you know what I mean?

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Okay.

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Yes.

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Nine times out of 10 calories in versus calories out will work for

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some people, but the 10% of the people there, it doesn't work for them.

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They start the bullying.

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There's something wrong with them and then they need to get down the rabbit

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hole of back holster and whatever else.

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And we actually did a podcast, not recently of when calories in

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versus calories that doesn't work.

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Because again, I didn't want to misinform people of this is the way to do it.

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Just eat less than.

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Your body expands.

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And then they're like it doesn't work for me.

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So I needed to give, I needed to give I guess a broad caveat to that as well.

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It's tough.

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It's tough because I'm very I guess I have a quite a strong opinion on a lot

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of things in terms of the industry as a whole, but I also want to contradict

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myself in a lot of things because then people will start bringing Scott.

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Doesn't fucking know he's talking about you talked long enough on the internet.

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At some point you're gonna you're gonna say something.

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And it's hold on.

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Three years ago.

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Yeah.

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Three years ago, I read a post that you wrote on somebody else's Facebook page.

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And you said, this is the opposite.

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If you have the time to speak, going through research that and

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go back up the front office, the internet, they have to time.

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True.

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True, man.

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This is, this has been awesome.

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Best place for people to reach out to you.

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The website.

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No, the website's shit.

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So if you want to, but if you want to book a call with me, call is the website.

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Yes.

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The best place to put your call.

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BC duct treatment, the best place probably to find me Nye is his

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Twitter just at Ben counting 87.

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It's a strange place that I find myself in, but even like Instagram.

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And so the guy I don't really use as much anymore, just because

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of the people that I work with.

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So get me on Twitter.

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If you want to book a call BC, they'll train on the website

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and I'm gladly speak to you.

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That's awesome.

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And I will say really extensive questionnaire.

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It's a good friction.

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No, and I agree until the, we hack hashtag we have health.

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I do recommend if you're looking for a community, a non-judgemental just

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whatever fits what you're doing, post up there, use a hashtag follow that hashtag.

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And to be honest with you, I really didn't screw around with Twitter that

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much until I started doing that now.

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I'm on it all the time.

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Thank you for that.

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You're welcome.

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I, again, I don't think I had tweeted since 2014 and then David's

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oh, you ain't go on Twitter.

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I was like, really?

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The people still use that.

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And I'm like, I'm on all the time.

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It's actually cool because it's a shit show in some ways,

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but it's called skill space.

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Definitely, the, that we have called text tag people, some

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people are doing really cool shit.

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And even in the discord, like the discords grew and grew on every

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single day, every single week.

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So it's cool to see the support that comes far beyond just me to what I mean.

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It's true.

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Building community.

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That's, you know what this is about having outreach, me,

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being able to reach out to you.

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I'll be honest with you.

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I wouldn't know who you were until this was, I don't know that our paths would

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ever would have crossed maybe not.

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I don't know, but now they have, we are, and we've recorded an art

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of conversation that the world can listen to what a great then.

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And then they banned me from Twitter.

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I've never been allowed to record a podcast since your book, my license, man.

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This has been awesome.

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Yeah.

About the Podcast

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The Business Samurai
Skills and Stories to be a Well-Rounded Leader in Business

About your host

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John Barker

20+ years of technology, cybersecurity, and project management experience. Improving business operations to create a culture of better cybersecurity and technology practices. John is the Founder of Barker Management Consulting and the creator of the Business Samurai Program.

MBA, PMP, CISSP